IMG_1482 (700x392)IMG_1478 (700x393)IMG_1465 (700x394)IMG_1466 (700x395)IMG_1467 (700x394)IMG_1468 (700x392)IMG_1469 (700x392)IMG_1470 (700x392)IMG_1471 (700x392)IMG_1472 (700x393)IMG_1473 (700x392)IMG_1474 (700x395)IMG_1475 (700x394)IMG_1476 (700x394)IMG_1477 (700x394)IMG_1463 (700x393)IMG_1464 (700x394)IMG_1447 (700x394)IMG_1460 (700x392)IMG_1461 (700x392)IMG_1462 (700x392)IMG_1250 (2) (700x394)IMG_1250 (700x394)IMG_1251 (700x394)IMG_1252 (700x392)IMG_1254 (700x394)IMG_1255 (2) (700x394)IMG_1255 (700x393)IMG_1256 (700x394)IMG_1257 (700x393)IMG_1259 (700x394)IMG_1261 (700x394)IMG_1264 (700x394)IMG_1249 (700x394)IMG_1219 (700x394)IMG_1220 (700x393)IMG_1221 (700x395)IMG_1222 (700x393)IMG_1223 (700x394)IMG_1224 (700x394)IMG_1225 (700x394)IMG_1226 (700x393)IMG_1245 (2) (700x392)IMG_1245 (700x392)IMG_1246 (700x393)IMG_1247 (700x394)IMG_1191 (700x393)IMG_1193 (700x395)IMG_1217 (700x393)IMG_1175 (700x393)IMG_1189 (700x393)IMG_1190 (700x395)

Featured

Conway Look and Say Sequence--Run Length Encoding

The Conway Sequence is a sequence of digits (also called Look-and-Say sequence) where each term is made of the reading of the digits (the number of consecutive digits) of the previous term. Conway created this sequence as a method of decoding called Run-Length Encoding.

Conway Look and Say Sequence--Run Length Encoding

The Conway Sequence is a sequence of digits (also called Look-and-Say sequence) where each term is made of the reading of the digits (the number of consecutive digits) of the previous term. Conway created this sequence as a method of decoding called Run-Length Encoding.

THE SUM-PRODUCT PUZZLE: Number of Distinct Entries Patterns

In 1983 the prolific conjecturer Paul Erdős posed a math problem: Take any set of numbers you like.

Recycling Symbol Mobius Strip — Trees/CO2/Oxygen/Gasoline Burn

The Möbius strip has been the universal recycling symbol since the early 1970s. It symbolizes an endless cycle of recycling.

 

Mobius Strip (1 face, 1edge) and Cylindrical Loops (2 faces, 2 edges)

Building on our exploration of perimeter in one dimension and area in two dimensions, we entered the real world of three dimensions. Starting with a rectangular strip of paper about 1.5” x 11” (by cutting a 1.5” piece the long way from a piece of regular 8.5” X 11” paper), I taped the two short edges together to make a cylindrical loop.